Sebastiano Serafini – It’s beautiful when two strangers become best friends, it’s terribly depressing when two best friends become strangers

It’s beautiful when two strangers become best friends, it’s terribly depressing when two best friends become strangers.

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One crazy thing about life is the fact that we never know who is going to be there for us in times that we thought they always would. Sometimes people that you consider your closest friends disappear by your side, while people that you least expect to be there for you, make their way into your life when you need it most.

Be open, be honest, be kind, be a friend, love your family and most of all follow your heart. Not everyone is for you, and sometimes it takes a lot of strength to get away from those who really aren’t.

You can find Sebastiano Serafini on Facebook, Twitter. Instagram, Google + and Youtube as well.

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3 thoughts on “Sebastiano Serafini – It’s beautiful when two strangers become best friends, it’s terribly depressing when two best friends become strangers

  1. These words are so true. Our friendships are more numerous than our romantic relationships and are as varied as the people we share them with. They begin and are based on so many factors – where we live, activities we participate in, where we work, go to school, exercise. Each circumstance, a jumping off point from casual acquaintance to the possibility of true life-long friendship.

    One thing about people that doesn’t change is that they change – not necessarily in big ways – but we are all changing. Every day our experiences and interactions adjust our knowledge, our feelings, and our beliefs. We are still ourselves, but we have a changed view of the world and the people we share it with. Because we are each involved in the same process, there is the possibility that some differences will begin to effect relationships.
    Sometimes, also, relationships are formed based upon an emotional or psychological developmental task the individuals are working on and their relationship is part of their unconscious push to work on that task. When one or both complete that task, then the relationship disolves. If someone continues to form relationships that result in the same sort of challenge, then that can indicate where a task is a work in progress, where the individual is striving to grow. This can explain why some friendships fade away at certain times in our lives – early childhood, grade school, young adulthood, etc. Those are natural boundaries as our lives progress.
    Just like romantic relationships, some friendships can be life-long bonds between soul mates. Losing a friend like that can be as life-changing as a divorce or a death. I lost my best, best, best friend through death. Nothing could ever change our history, our mutual respect, the experiences we went through together, or the unconditional love we shared, but with every passing year we were changing. She was very deeply immersed in a life focused on a fundamentalist religion while I was pulled in a completely different direction spiritually. Though she is gone now and I’ll never know with certainty, I believe our friendship would have survived these differences, but some of our closeness would have been lost, because our beliefs were no longer shared in common.
    Though it probably sounds rather cynical, it seems life is loss. We strive continually for love, peace and happiness – hope and desire for relief the forces pushing us onward – but those greatest of desires are elusive and fleeting. Yet we get up, brush ourselves off, and with hope as our inspiration we fight onward. If we’re fortunate, our lives are a series of serene interludes seasoned with the blissful highs of exuberant happiness and breathtaking love and our lows only the briefest of punctuations, the poignancy that underlines the sweetness of our highs. And friendship … it is the best and dearest of what our lives can hold. It’s our friendships that make our lives. And how happy I am to learn that despite a busy schedule and limited social outlets, there is still the hope of great friendship.
    What I’ve learned in this wondrous world of cyber connectedness is that time, age, circumstance, and geographic separation do not constitute barriers to friendship; it takes curiosity, respect, a mutual desire for connection, and a willingness to invest the self. Cyber friendships are a pen-pal kind of friendship, but I have great faith in that mode. …much of my best friendship was based on letters. My best friend and I were apart geographically more years than we lived near one another. Written words can be a more precise and deliberate mode of communication and have the power to create an easy, open intimacy that reveals more of the authentic person. And therein lies the basis of lasting friendship. I live with hope in my family, my in-person friends, and the friendships I am building in the ether.
    I’ve gone off on quite a tangent, but I’m grateful for the impetus of your words to push my thoughts in this direction. I’ve spent an introspective morning in written meditation writing and rewriting these thoughts – learning what I believe at this moment. Thank you again for sharing your thoughts.

  2. Ehi, ehi, Seba che è successo??? Così mi fai preoccupare!
    Concordo con quello che hai scritto, per carità, è successo anche a me, ma ci sento troppo di personale in questo post ed è terribile, mi dispiace! 😦
    Non ti buttare giù, ok? O vengo lì a scuoterti!
    Tu hai un mucchio di persone che ti vogliono bene, non te lo devi dimenticare mai! Intesi?
    Un mega abbraccio! Spero che riuscirai a sentirlo anche da lì!

  3. i got this story so long time on high school. maybe it’s attitude as child. break off to be friend 6 years ago from a little story. but now we grew up ,attitude changed and we had goal that we support together. the past look like a funny story. ok it’s hard that everything back the same before. maybe it turn down conviction together.

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